Preparedness

_DSC8341.jpg

Preparedness, this is an easy thing to overlook. We build are Jeeps to handle all kinds of rugged terrain, but we sometimes forget that accidents happen, that we could break down and be spending time waiting for help.

This was my set-up during my second wheeling trip to Moab.

As you can see, some basic tools. In the Molle bag on the left, I carried my air gauge and an adjustable wrench...

As you can see, some basic tools. In the Molle bag on the left, I carried my air gauge and an adjustable wrench...

I use the long drive home from Moab to Chicago to mull over all aspects of my build, how the upgrades performed, etc.. During my last Moab trip, we were running Kane Creek Canyon. We had been on the trail for most of the day, hadn't seen another Jeeper and was about to tackle Hamburger Hill. It was then I realized that we are miles from nowhere in the back country. I could see the remains of a wrecked Jeep at the bottom of Horseshoe Canyon as we began to work our way up Hamburger Hill.

What if we had a mishap out here? What if we needed to give aid to another person? Was I as prepared as I could be? Could we react in a way that gave us a chance until help arrived, or we could make our way out? This was when it hit me that I didn't have anything more with me than a few bandaids in my travel bag.

When we got home, I started doing research on a good first aid kit I could keep in the Jeep. This led me to MY Medic. I now carry their MYFAK first aid kit.

_DSC8309.jpg

What I like about this kit is that it is very complete, portable and easy to use. The MY FAK Basic contents allows you to treat: BLEEDING, BURN, SPRAIN & FRACTURE, AIRWAY, TOPICAL, MEDICATION, ADVENTURE & SURVIVAL, SPECIALTY. 

myfak-mymedic-first-aid-backpack-kit.jpg.778x431_q85_crop-smart.jpg

The kit features a velcro tear away backing that allows you to remove it quickly from the base. Inside are three separate compartments that also are removable. This allows you to concentrate on treating what first aid is required, cut, burn, etc..

I mounted mine to the Springtails Solutions Molle table inside the cargo door. It's always there and is easy to access.

_DSC8361.jpg
_DSC8341.jpg

It is easy enough to remove and take with you if you leave the Jeep and going trekking off somewhere. Simply unclip it, tear it off, and it's portable. This is the kind of peace of mind we should never be without.

 

               + + +   I Can get you 15% off using the code:  EXPEDITIONBUILDS15   +++

 


Trail Tools

_DSC6714.jpg

I used all three of these tools on my last outing in Moab. While working our way through Kane Creek trail, we encountered a lot of overgrowth as we entered the creek. In places, we had to cut back the growth to get the Jeep through. The axe is great for firewood, kindling, etc.. I have since added a Fiskars tree saw. I always wheel with a partner, two can make quick work of cutting...

 

This is a little bigger saw than the SOG I carry. It will be helpful on the bigger branches, firewood...

This is a little bigger saw than the SOG I carry. It will be helpful on the bigger branches, firewood...

_DSC8553.jpg

I have this saw mounted on my WD Auto/GraBars ARB Compressor Mount...

This location makes the saw easy to reach and up out of the way...

This location makes the saw easy to reach and up out of the way...

Next up, I'll be adding a quality trail shovel.


potable water

_DSC6718.jpg

 

To carry this inside the Jeep, I ordered a FourTreks mount from Rebel Offroad. 

_DSC6708.jpg

And a Deluxe Pax Mount...

_DSC6715.jpg

Here it is bolted together...

_DSC6720.jpg

and mounted to my roll bar...

_DSC6727.jpg

and here is the final installation...

_DSC6735.jpg
_DSC6738.jpg

I really like this location, as it utilizes what is really unused space in the JKU. The FourTreks mount has proved to be rock solid and noise free. The RotoPax is easy to reach and use. 

On my last trip in Moab, we camped overnight on the trail. It was great to have the 2 gallons of water with us at the campsite, for drinking, cooking, cleaning and putting out the fire. The RotoPax water packs are made from food grade plastic, so they are safe for drinking water.



Krazy Beaver Shovel


After a couple of trips wheeling in Moab, I knew I wanted to add a good shovel as part of the tools I carry onboard. A shovel is nice to have at the campsite, and completely necessary if you get stuck. I liked the design of the Krazy Beaver with the serrated teeth on the leading edge that allow for digging/chopping through roots, ice, etc.. At 40” long, I think I’ve figured out a nice place/way to mount it.

SPECS

  • 13 Ga. Steel Head (twice as think as a normal shovel)

  • American Made

  • Lightweight Fiberglass Handle

  • Removable D-Grip (storage inside of handle)

  • 40” Long

The shovel with it’s extra heavy head has a nice weighted feel to it. Here’s how I mounted it in Rub. I’ll be using Quick-Fist clamps to secure the shovel to my rear roll bar.

DSC_0058.jpg

I’m using two(2) Super Quick Fist clamps, and two(2) Original Quick Fist clamps. The Supers hold objects: 2.5”-9”, the Originals hold objects: 1”-2.25” in diameter.

DSC_0053.jpg

I bolted the small clamps to the larger ones, giving me this…

DSC_0056.jpg

This allowed me to use the large clamps to wrap around the roll bar…

DSC_0060.jpg

And here it is installed…

DSC_0063.jpg

We’ll see how well this mounting system holds up on the trail. I like this because it utilizes a previously unused space, and the rubber Quick-Fist clamps should be quiet. The shovel is easy to release and takes seconds to reinstall. I’m thinking my wife will ask me to buy the cover for the shovel…looks a little aggressive hanging back there!






extra fuel

Running out of fuel while on the trail is not an option. I have been in situations where we were linking trails, and I was limited by my gas gauge. When you see the gauge at half a tank, it's time to think about heading back. 

I currently carry extra fuel when I'm out wheeling via the RotoPax fuel containers. I have two of these mounted on my roof rack. Here's a look at how I installed those. RotoPax offers a unique way to transport fuel. The gas packs are stackable, linkable and very easy to handle.

RotoPax 2 Gal. fuel pack and Lox mount.

RotoPax 2 Gal. fuel pack and Lox mount.

I riveted the LOX pack mounts to my KMS Lo-Pro rack...

_DSC7803.jpg
_DSC7804.jpg
_DSC7813.jpg

This has worked very well for me. I like that the low profile of the RotoPax sit down under the side rails.

_DSC7837.jpg
_DSC7821.jpg
_DSC7828.jpg

I access these by standing on the rear tires, which makes for a stable platform to reach whatever is on the rack.

IMG_8651.jpg

rotopax gas pack features:

 

- Made in USA.

- EPA and CARB Compliant

- Patented 3 Layer design

It's great to know you've got extra fuel onboard, whether for yourself, or someone in need. RotoPax offers a great system to safely add this extra fuel capacity.

 


 

Hi-Lift Jack

 

Being able jack up a lifted Jeep requires more than the stock jack Jeep provides us with. We need a device that has an extended lift range, is strong, and hopefully simple to use. We need to cary the Hi-Lift jack with us. I own the 48" model. It's capable of lifting more than 3.5 tons. It can also be used as a come along in a pinch! Need I say more.

_DSC7909_zpsgd328de6-2.JPG

I carry mine attached to my KMS roof rack. Here's a look at how I mounted mine. I started with the 4XRAC mounts. I riveted the mounts to my rack... 

_DSC7908_zpsdbohygqy.JPG
_DSC7913_zpss0ihoddv.JPG

The mounts feature a speedy wing nut, and are drilled to accept a lock through the stud. Here it is installed on Rubi...

_DSC7919.jpg
_DSC7918_zpsw4ej4me2.JPG

Having the Hi-Lift roof mounted frees up space inside. It's a good feeling knowing you are prepared...

 


Steven Talley7 Comments